Following the Prime Minister’s announcement on 23rd March 2019, all weddings and other social gatherings due to take place within a minimum of the next 3 weeks must now be cancelled/postponed. Read our advice and guidance on this here.

Insurance documents

Your insurance – what you should look for in relation to the Coronavirus

Please note: All of the information in our posts and articles is accurate and correct at the time it was published. As the Covid-19 situation evolves, our advice might change. We will be frequently publishing new, up-to-date articles and advice, to reflect this.

As a wedding supplier or venue, you will hopefully have insurance that should provide you with some cover during this outbreak.  Some considerations include Public Liability Insurance, Travel Insurance, Employers Liability Insurance, Business Interruption and some other key areas of cover.   

To make it easier for you, we have a brief overview of what you might want to look for within the cover you have and how this might be applied to the Coronavirus.   

CAVEAT:  Weddingly in no way advocates any person undertaking risks which should be avoided in relation to Coronavirus and firmly recommends that everyone should follow the UK Government and NHS guidelines on steps to protect themselves and others, and restrict the spread of Coronavirus.  You should also seek advice from a Legal Professional should you require more bespoke advice.

Public Liability Cover:  

Designed to protect you against claims from customers and members of the public (ie. Wedding guests), Public Liability Cover usually sets a limit of protection ie. £10 million, in the event of being sued.   

How can this be applied to the Coronavirus?:  If you failed to adequately protect your customers and members of the public, this insurance should cover you.   

Employer’s Liability Cover:  

This cover is designed to protect you against the costs of being sued by an employee.   

How can this be applied to the Coronavirus?:  If you, or another member of the team, was known to have travelled back from a country affected by Coronavirus or who had been exposed to COVID-19 and knowingly continued to be in contact with other members of staff.   

Business Interruption Cover:  

This cover is designed to protect you against costs, or loss of income or gross profit, associated with your business being interrupted by things outside of your control.  Usually it covers things like flood or fire damage but may also cover interruption as a result of COVID-19 as well.   

How can this be applied to the Coronavirus?:  If your business was adversely affected by COVID-19 such as staff members being off with the virus.  

What to look out for:   

  • Review any clauses which mitigate claims based on not following appropriate measures that you were provided with ie. If you travel/have travelled to a restricted location, you may not have cover 
  • Make sure you check if pandemics/epidemics or diseases are exclusions which apply to each element of your cover 
  • Wording such as “Acts of God” or “Force Majeure” may also cover pandemics/epidemics – check your policy wording carefully  
  • You may still have to pay an excess on any claims you make  
  • You may have cover limits in place against specific areas of cover  
  • Cover which notes pandemic/epidemic/disease inclusions may have additional clauses regarding the disease being a “notifiable disease”.  The UK Government declared COVID-19 a notifiable human disease on 5th March 2020, however policies which require the disease to be notifiable prior to coverage will not be covered.  Speak with your policy provider for further clarification.  
  • COVID-19 may have to be confirmed at your place of work to have cover for business interruption or closure as a result.  Many situations will require businesses to close as a precautionary measure, this would not necessarily provide you with cover.   
  • Voluntary closure of your business may not be covered, even if “recommended”.  An order for closure by your local authority may be required for cover to be in place.  The same may be true of self-isolation.   
  • You are duty-bound to minimise the loss to the insurance provider, you might do that by providing flexible working, working from home, reducing non-essential costs and attempting to meet your obligations by working with other suppliers.    Wording such as “Acts of God” or “Force Majeure” may also cover pandemics/epidemics – check your policy wording carefully  
  • You may still have to pay an excess on any claims you make  
  • You may have cover limits in place against specific areas of cover  
  • Cover which notes pandemic/epidemic/disease inclusions may have additional clauses regarding the disease being a “notifiable disease”.  The UK Government declared COVID-19 a notifiable human disease on 5th March 2020, however policies which require the disease to be notifiable prior to coverage will not be covered.  Speak with your policy provider for further clarification.  
  • COVID-19 may have to be confirmed at your place of work to have cover for business interruption or closure as a result.  Many situations will require businesses to close as a precautionary measure, this would not necessarily provide you with cover.   

A final word on taking out new insurance:  

New insurance purchases may now exclude cover for:  

  • Pandemics or epidemics  
  • Coronaviruses as a whole 
  • COVID-19  

Disclaimer: This information is provided as guidance only, you must check your own policies and the related terms and conditions for information related to your own specific policy.  If you are not sure about any information provided, you must check with your insurance provider directly or take the advice of a legal professional.